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#CensusFail: Another example of why we should never trust the Australian government

In the aftermath of one of the biggest digital collapses in Australian history, the Turnbull government’s response to the Census fail has left more questions than it has answers, as officials continue to flip-flop over vague technical explanations and even contradict themselves on whether the DDOS attack it announced this morning was even an attack.

In the following opinion piece, Ethan Nash takes a look at some of the companies and departments behind the 2016 Census and gives a brief history of government behaviour with the privacy of Australian citizens.

Census 2016: ‘The most significant invasion of privacy ever perpetrated on Australians’

For more than 100 years, the Census has “provided a snapshot of Australia, showing how our nation has changed over time and allowing us to plan for the future.”

However, as Australians prepare to partake in the latest Census tomorrow, there has been some concerning new changes to the process that has outraged citizens and privacy advocates, as Ethan Nash explains.

How a secretive elite created the EU to build a world government

It has been one week since the world was left in a state of shock following the results of a referendum in the United Kingdom to exit the European Union, with many debates continuing from campaigners about the long-lasting effects a decision like this could have on the world.

In the following feature, Ethan Nash re-examines the history of the EU, from the early days of united trading in Europe, to the rise of a powerful Anglo-American political lobby behind the original campaign, and the vested interests that continue to control the EU and benefit from the current European financial crisis.

Who really owns the ‘Big Four’ banks in Australia?

Australia’s ‘Big Four’ are not merely big, they’re massive.

Their combined assets stood at $2.86 trillion in 2013 – or roughly twice the size of Australia’s national income.

They also annually make up four of the five largest Australian companies by market capitalisation, together representing more than a quarter of the market, with control of 88% of residential mortgages and 80% of deposits according to the IMF.