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Search results: biometrics

Discussion: Smart cities, neuro-surveillance, biometrics

Smart cities are being developed across Australia as part of the Agenda 2030 plan, and the mechanisms in which they are being constructed reveal a deeper plot linked to China’s dystopian ‘social credit’ surveillance.

In the following, Ethan Nash from TOTT News appeared on Ramola D Reports to discuss Australia’s move towards a similar control system.

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Gamification, ‘Social Credit’ and Biometrics | Ft. General Maddox

The use of biometrics is increasing due to a combination of globalization, developments in information technology and the desire to identify and track individuals.

In the following video, Ethan Nash from TOTT News is joined by General Maddox from Real News Australia to discuss the increase of sophisticated technologies.

NSW to further privatise bus services

The New South Wales government has announced plans to privatise bus services in Sydney’s north-western suburbs, lower-north shore, northern beaches and eastern suburbs.

The move follows ongoing privatization of assets and infrastructure across the state in recent years, including industries such as water, electricity, public transport and public hospitals.

Concerns raised over national facial recognition

Plans to pass legislation permitting the use of national face-identity matching services has come under criticism by some of Australia’s largest privacy groups.

Civil liberty advocates, including Digital Rights Watch and others, have spoken out against plans to monitor all citizens via advanced biometric CCTV capabilities.

Australia: The Road to Digital Tyranny

Once upon a time, the personal life of the individual citizen was considered to be a sphere of absolute privacy, where one could reliably escape the prying eyes of the outside world.

Australians have incrementally signed away rights and privileges that other generations fought for, undermining the very cornerstones of our democratic cultures in the process, Ethan Nash argues.

Facial recognition legislation under review

The government is pushing ahead with plans for a national facial recognition database.

Discussion: Fluoride, 5G backlash, data mining

The Australian government is in damage control after a loophole revealed councils were subjected to liabilities for fluoridation programs — moving to exclude the toxin from the Therapeutics Goods Act (TGA).

On the latest episode of the General Knowledge Podcast, Ethan Nash from TOTT News and General Maddox from Real News Australia discuss new developments in the fluoridation saga, ‘small cell’ installations blocked, online privacy and more.

Facial recognition set for Sydney transport network

The New South Wales government has revealed plans to roll out facial recognition technology across the public transport network as an alternative to Opal cards.

The announcement follows similar moves in Queensland, where the same company responsible for ‘tap-and-go’ technology is incorporating biometric identification into train and bus systems.

Are Chinese tech companies spying on Australia?

Surveillance systems, most notably CCTV cameras and advanced biometric technologies, have expanded at an unprecedented rate in Australia since the events of September 11th, and today have become a security staple of governments, private businesses and individuals alike.

Authorities and experts have both raised concerns that some of the most popular brands of cameras, drones and other accessories in Australia, are being used as a surveillance intermediary for foreign entities, particularly the Chinese government.

Classroom app ranks students on ‘set behaviours’

A new classroom application that ranks students based on behaviours, allowing teachers to “automate the task of recording classroom conduct” by monitoring and storing data, is raising concerns in Australia.

The program, ClassDojo, has now spread to over 25% of classrooms across the country and is set to expand with continued growth of the educational software market – estimated to be worth almost $8 billion.