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Search results: FACIAL RECOGNITION

Committee rejects facial recognition legislation

Australia’s Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security has ordered the government back to the drawing board, after rejecting laws to establish a national facial recognition database.

It is the first time since 2002 that a parliament committee has recommended new intelligence laws be withdrawn, saying the legislation needs to be redrafted to ensure citizen rights are protected.

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Concerns raised over national facial recognition

Plans to pass legislation permitting the use of national face-identity matching services has come under criticism by some of Australia’s largest privacy groups.

Civil liberty advocates, including Digital Rights Watch and others, have spoken out against plans to monitor all citizens via advanced biometric CCTV capabilities.

Facial recognition activated without notification

New revelations have revealed Melbourne authorities are using CCTV cameras with facial recognition capabilities across the CBD, while Perth has already begun their surveillance trial.

Both locations have activated the biometric technologies without formally notifying the public of proposals.

Facial recognition legislation under review

The government is pushing ahead with plans for a national facial recognition database.

Facial recognition set for Sydney transport network

The New South Wales government has revealed plans to introduce new biometric systems.

Australian airports begin facial recognition rollout

Perth Airport has become Australia’s second international airport to begin installing new facial recognition smart gates, following an initial pilot trial introduced at Canberra Airport last year.

The Australian government has stated their intended goal is to automate 90% of air traveler processing by 2020, and is on track to replace passports with biometric capabilities after signing new contracts with technology vendors for a national rollout.

Facial recognition technology to stay following Commonwealth Games

Queensland Government officials have announced that facial recognition technology introduced for security during the 2018 Commonwealth Games will remain in place indefinitely, but won’t say what future use they have in mind for the biometric system.

Civil liberty campaigners say the refusal to release plans for the installed software amounts to a ‘disturbing development in mass surveillance’, with privacy advocates concerned about how the technology will be used in conjunction with the new national facial recognition program.

Government could allow private firms access to facial recognition data

The federal government is considering allowing private companies to use its national facial recognition database for a fee, documents released under Freedom of Information laws have revealed.

The partially redacted documents released this week show that the Attorney General’s Department is in discussions with major telecommunications companies about pilot programs for private sector use of the new national facial recognition system in 2018.

Revealed: Australia’s national facial recognition system

The Australian government has unveiled new details surrounding highly controversial changes to ‘anti-terrorism’ measures this week, including the introduction of a new national facial recognition system, following the Coalition of Australian Governments (COAG) meeting in Canberra last month.

The changes, outlined in draft documents released this week, describe the use of new ‘federated identity ecosystems’ (or ‘identity federations’) to share information between authorised agencies, including the introduction of a new ‘trust framework’ system to replace traditional legal processes.

Facial recognition ‘incompatible with a free society’, privacy groups warn

Australia’s leading privacy and civil liberties organisations have condemned the decision by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) to provide all images from state and territory driver’s licence databases to a national facial biometric capability system.

The organisations, including the Australian Privacy Foundation, Digital Rights Watch, Queensland Council for Civil Liberties, NSW Council for Civil Liberties, Liberty Victoria, South Australian Council for Civil Liberties and Electronic Frontiers Australia, have called the comprehensive facial recognition database ‘unnecessary’ and ‘fundamentally incompatible with a free and open society’.